Health Needs, Health Care Utilization and Satisfaction Derived from Facilities: Report from Rural Dwellers in Southern Nigeria

  • MI Ntaji Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria
Keywords: Health needs, choices, satisfaction, rural Nigeria

Abstract

The demand for health services in a community is influenced by a number of factors, which could be due to staff attitude, experience of persons, staff expertise and physical factors such as the distance of the facility from patients. A number of facilities may be available, ranging from traditional medicine to Western scientific medicine. This study was aimed at finding out the percentage of respondents who had visited health facilities on account of ill health, the reasons for the visit, the type of facility chosen and the satisfaction obtained from the facility.
A descriptive study design was used for this research. A semi structured questionnaire was designed and used to obtain information from 350 respondents residing in a rural community in southern Nigeria. Analysis was by SPSS version 21.0 soft-ware.
About two-thirds, 64.9%, had visited a facility in the stated period. The most reason for their visit was malaria and fever related causes. Primary health centres were most visited, 38.8%, while satisfaction with services was obtained most from private health facilities, 100.0%.
More than half of the population had to visit a facility on account of ill health within a span of six months. Respondents had variety of services to choose from among which primary health centres topped the list but satisfaction was obtained most from the private health facilities.

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Published
2019-07-20
How to Cite
Ntaji, M. (2019). Health Needs, Health Care Utilization and Satisfaction Derived from Facilities: Report from Rural Dwellers in Southern Nigeria. JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN BASIC AND CLINICAL SCIENCES, 1(2), 143-149. Retrieved from http://jrbcs.org/index.php/jrbcs/article/view/35